Alec Jorgensen

With a background of residency training in equine sports medicine and lameness in the USA, and a Diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners Equine Specialty; Alec joined Waikato Equine Veterinary Centre (A division of Hamilton Veterinary Services) in 2005. Since then he has had principle responsibility for Sales horses within the practice. With an emphasis on quality, consistency and integrity; few veterinarians in Australasia would annually take, review and report on, as many weanling and yearling radiographs as Alec. 

Latest developments in orthopaedic therapies | Friday 25 June 11:50am

Lameness examination – when things get complicated | Friday 25 June 2:30pm

Contentious issues in sports horse pre-purchase examination | Friday 25 June 4:40pm

Angela Hawker

Angela graduated from Massey University in 2001. After two years at Canterbury Equine Clinic, she completed an Internship in Neonatology and Critical Care at Ohio State University and Scone Equine Hospital’s Clovelly Intensive Care Unit. Angela stayed on in Scone and gained membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists in Equine Medicine. After this, she returned to New Zealand and has been in Cambridge for the last sixteen years. During the breeding season most of her work involves reproductive and stud medicine work on thoroughbred farms, but she also enjoys all aspects of managing athletic horses and is fascinated by internal medicine challenges, particularly the intensive care of neonates.

How to perform a thoracic ultrasound with a rectal probe | Thursday 24 June 9:40am

How to perform an auriculopalpebral and a supraorbital nerve block | Thursday 24 June 1:30 pm

Ben Sykes

Gastric ulcers in horses | Wednesday 23 June 10:30am

Gastric ulcers in foals | Wednesday 24 June 11:30am

How to assess for reflux | Thursday 24 June 9:20am

Clinical case discussions | Thursday 24 June 10:30am | Join in an open discussion of exciting clinical cases offered by your international speakers Katharyn Mitchell and Ben Sykes, share your views on the most suitable way of progressing the cases and appreciate the practical conundrums raised in the presentations.

Gut health | Thursday 24 June 1:30pm

Update on parasitology | Thursday 24 June 2:30pm

Goldie hour | Thursday 24 June 4:40pm | The Gouldie Hour was initiated at the 2013 NZEVA Conference to recognise the considerable contributions made by Dr Brian Goulden to undergraduate, to post-graduate, and to continuing equine veterinary education in New Zealand. As continued celebration of Brian’s superb input to equine veterinary science, Katharyn Mitchell, Ben Sykes & Joe Mayhew will attempt to titillate, annoy, stimulate, entertain, challenge and hopefully edify colleagues on papers and issues from the current equine.

Brendon Bell

Brendon graduated in 1985. He initially worked in mixed practice in NZ before travelling to the UK and practicing for 3 years in equine practice. This was followed by a 3 year equine surgical residency in the USA. On returning to NZ he worked in Auckland before returning to Invercargill where he has been in equine practice for the last 25 years.

VPIS update | Wednesday 23 June 1:30pm | The Veterinary Professional Insurance Society (VPIS) insure approximately 80% of New Zealand’s practicing veterinarians. Each year we deal with around 100 cases, 15% of which relate to horses. VPIS sees the organisation as being more than just a commercial insurer; it has a pastoral role in looking after the wellbeing of its members. This means we try to mitigate risk, thereby reducing the number of veterinarians who have to experience litigious or disciplinary activities. As part of that process, at the annual conference, we present recent cases we have dealt with and lessons that can be learnt from these. This presentation is to give delegates this year’s update.

How to perform a palmar digital and an abaxial sesamoid nerve block | Thursday 24 June 8:00am | The palmar digital and abaxial sesamoid nerve blocks are valuable procedures to use for lameness diagnosis and to alleviate pain in the distal foot area. A simple, safe and repeatabe technique to perform these procedures will be discussed.

How to determine joint involvement with wounds | Thursday 24 June 8:20am | The involvement of a joint in a wound on horses legs greatly complicates both treatment and prognosis. Early recognition and treatment for joint sepsis greatly improves the outcome. Some practical tips on how to recognise joint involvement will be discussed.

Brett Gartell

When things go wrong in practice | Thursday 24 June 4:00pm

Chris Phillips

How to remove foetal membranes | Thursday 24 June 2:30pm

How to perform a 1-day-old foal check | Thursday 24 June 2:50pm

Chris Riley

After degrees in physics and veterinary medicine at the University Melbourne, Chris completed an equine internship at Murdoch University and then a surgical residency at the University of Saskatchewan (Canada) concurrent with MSc and PhD degrees in equine tendon healing. He was certified as a Diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Surgeons while working as an emergency clinician at Iowa State University (USA) in 1998. He then spent 11 years at the Atlantic Veterinary College, Canada (Professor & Service Chief of Large Animal Surgery). After 3 years as the first Professor of Equine Health at the University of Adelaide, he joined Massey University in 2013 as Chair and Professor of Equine Clinical Studies. He is currently Director of Research Commercialisation in the School of Veterinary Science in addition to working as a registered specialist in equine surgery. He has parallel research interests in animal and human health and welfare and their interdependence. His scientific research is multispecies and multidisciplinary, collaborating on projects in early detection of osteoarthritis in horses and dogs, regenerative medicine, improving the transport welfare of horses, and animal emergency rescue and disaster management. Chris is the team manager for the Massey University Veterinary Emergency Response Team.

Systematic equine lameness localisation and the place of new technologies | Friday 25 June 9:00am | The systematic evaluation of the lame horse is critical to making a correct diagnosis. The limitations of traditional approaches complicate the process of diagnosis. Further confusion can occur with the challenges of multi limb lameness and the day to day variations that can occur in the severity of lameness. This presentation will discuss these concepts and briefly introduce technological advances in lameness detection and localisation such as thermography, force plate analysis and body-mounted inertial sensors.  

Diagnosis of distal limb lesions in the horse using contrast computed tomography | Friday 25 June 5:00pm | Computed tomography (CT) is a 3D imaging modality that uses x-ray attenuation to create images, providing high-level bony detail without superimposition compared with radiography. This presentation will discuss the indications for CT imaging studies of the distal equine limb. The equipment and procedures used to generate CT images will be described. This will be followed by the presentation of some of the more interesting cases, and the CT findings that led to specific diagnoses.

Emanuelle Van Erck

Emmanuelle graduated in 1996 from the French Veterinary School of Maisons-Alfort. She trained in sports medicine at the University of Liège (Belgium) where she obtained her PhD on respiratory function testing in horses. She developped the equine sports medicine unit and consulted as senior clinician in the CIRALE in Normandy (France). In January 2010, she started her own ambulatory referral practice, the ‘Equine Sports Medicine Practice’, based in Belgium. Her practice offers specialized service in equine internal and sports medicine throughout Europe, following national teams and international riders. Emmanuelle authored over 50 peer-reviewed scientific articles and regularly lectures at international conferences. She is a member of the FEI expert committee on prohibited substances and doping.

A novel perspective on overground endoscopy | Friday 25 June 8:00am

New ways of using haematology and biochemistry in sports horses | Friday 25 June 8:30am

Which heart murmurs are relevant in sports horses | Friday 25 June 9:10am

Exercise testing – identifying subclinical problems in sports horses | Friday 25 June 10:30am

Feeding the competitive athlete | Friday 25 June 11:10am

Greg Quinn

A registered Specialist and European Boarded Diplomate in Equine Surgery; Greg joined Waikato Equine Veterinary Centre in 2011. His caseload is principally composed of surgical and non-surgical orthopaedic and upper airway issues of the performance horse. Greg developed a strong interest in wound healing of horses around 15 years ago after completing his specialist exams in surgery. He has since run training courses for veterinarians in the UK and New Zealand, as well as presenting talks on wound healing at BEVA (UK) and other international meetings.

Why are equine wounds sometimes so hard to heal? Tips and tricks for improving results| Friday 25 June 4:00pm | Review of pathophysiology of wound healing - applicable to nurses, understanding why horses differ to other species, and why native breeds and ponies are better at healing compared to sport horses. Some essentials of dressing material selection, what primary dressings should be used for each stage of wound healing. Use of splints, casts and skin grafts to help heal wounds in tricky locations.

Gretel Webber

Gretel attended Roseworthy Agricultural College, South Australia where she competed an Associated Diploma in Applied Science in Horse Husbandry and Stud Management. She then continued to work within the equine industry in a variety of hands-on rolls. On returning to New Zealand in the early 90s, she completed a marketing degree and took on a marketing role with a leading animal feed manufacturer, however her interest and skill set saw her embrace the role of Equine Category Manager, with a focus on equine feed development, equine health and management and client liaison. Gretel joined the Dunstan Team in 2012. During this time, she returned to study and completed a Masters in Equine Science in 2017. The learnings from her thesis, ‘The Impact of High-Starch Diets on Equine Physiology and Behaviour’ has been invaluable in assisting horse owners with managing both their horse’s health and performance. Gretel’s extensive involvement with horses, including employment within the breeding and racing sectors, competing sporthorses and breeding has provided a great insight into the issues her clients face daily.

Feed management practices for digestive health in post-surgery equines | Friday 25 June 2:30pm | The types of feed stuffs best suited for horses post-surgery, and the accompanying management practices to benefit equine digestive health. The nutritional considerations for horses that undergo extended periods of box rest. Tailoring equine diets for type, temperament, and ailment during recuperation.

Joe Mayhew

Joe is a clinical equine veterinarian with interests in large animal neurology and comparative neuropathology. Currently he is Professor Emeritus in the School of Veterinary Sciences, Massey University, and has clinical, research and teaching experience on staff at the University of Florida, Cambridge University and Edinburgh University. He has published widely in veterinary neurology, equine medicine and comparative pathology. His textbook on large animal neurology has been published as the second edition: Mayhew IG. Large Animal Neurology. 2nd Ed. Wiley - Blackwell. Oxford. 2008 (www.amazon.com/Large-Animal-Neurology-Joe-Mayhew/dp/1405154934) and the 3rd edition is in press for 2021.

Clinical case discussion | Thursday 24 June 10:30am | Join in an open discussion of exciting clinical cases offered by your international speakers Katharyn Mitchell and Ben Sykes, share your views on the most suitable way of progressing the cases and appreciate the practical conundrums raised in the presentations.

Gouldie hour | Thursday 24 June 4:40pm | The Gouldie Hour was initiated at the 2013 NZEVA Conference to recognise the considerable contributions made by Dr Brian Goulden to undergraduate, to post-graduate, and to continuing equine veterinary education in New Zealand. As continued celebration of Brian’s superb input to equine veterinary science, Katharyn Mitchell, Ben Sykes & Joe Mayhew will attempt to titillate, annoy, stimulate, entertain, challenge and hopefully edify colleagues on papers and issues from the current equine.

Julia Whitehead

Julia has been passionate about Veterinary Physiotherapy since she was 16 years old when her competition horse sustained an injury and qualified Veterinary Physiotherapists were non-existent in New Zealand. Julia embarked on the journey to becoming a Veterinary Physiotherapist and graduated in 2005 with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy from the University of Otago. Shortly after being accepted into the Master’s programme in Veterinary Physiotherapy at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), University of London, the programme was withdrawn indefinitely. Julia returned to work in private practice in Auckland for 10 years and had the privilege of working with a few Springboks and All Blacks rugby players along the way. In 2016, Julia graduated with distinction in second place for her Post Graduate Diploma in Veterinary Physiotherapy through the University of Liverpool. During this time she worked for Veterinary Specialists Auckland and established Fusion Physio to work in a self-employed capacity with horses and riders. In 2020 Julia graduated from the University of Liverpool (in conjunction with Massey University) with a Master of Science gaining distinction. Julia has taken a short sabbatical from her Veterinary Physiotherapy career to focus on raising her 3 year old son who shares her passion for animals.

Equine physical/rehabilitative therapies: experiences and perceptions in New Zealand | Friday 25 June 10:30am | Equine physical and rehabilitation therapies continue to grow in popularity and are performed by veterinarians, veterinary nurses, professionally recognized therapists and laypeople. Equine industry participants’ perceptions of efficacy, and professional involvement or collaboration influences on outcome are not known. This Master’s degree study aimed to identify; what equine rehabilitation services New Zealand equine industry participants use; why; who is providing them; and what their value is in terms of contribution to equine health and welfare.

Katharyn Mitchell

Fever of unknown origin | Wednesday 23 June 8:00am

Equine cardiology | Wednesday 23 June 9:00am

Fluid therapy in the field | Thursday 24 June 8:00am

Colics in the field and when to refer | Thursday 24 June 9:00am

Clinical case discussions | Thursday 24 June 10:30am | Join in an open discussion of exciting clinical cases offered by your international speakers Katharyn Mitchell and Ben Sykes, share your views on the most suitable way of progressing the cases and appreciate the practical conundrums raised in the presentations.

How to auscultate the heart | Thursday 24 June 3:10pm |

Gouldie hour | Thursday 24 June 4:40pm | The Gouldie Hour was initiated at the 2013 NZEVA Conference to recognise the considerable contributions made by Dr Brian Goulden to undergraduate, to post-graduate, and to continuing equine veterinary education in New Zealand. As continued celebration of Brian’s superb input to equine veterinary science, Katharyn Mitchell, Ben Sykes & Joe Mayhew will attempt to titillate, annoy, stimulate, entertain, challenge and hopefully edify colleagues on papers and issues from the current equine.

Fluid therapy of the critically ill | Friday 25 June 1:30pm

Katie Kindleysides

How to age a horse with dentition | Thursday 24 June 8:40am

How to take dental radiographs | Thursday 24 June 9:00am 

Kylie Huxford

After graduating from Massey University in 2008, Kylie completed a 12-month internship at Agnes Banks Equine Clinic in Sydney, followed by 4 years as a stud vet in the Hunter Valley, working at Scone Equine Hospital. During this time, she passed her examinations for Membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (in Equine Medicine). Kylie then moved to the University of Sydney where she completed a three-year residency in Equine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, and more recently also passed her American Board Exams. Kylie joined Cambridge Equine Hospital in 2019, where she has enjoyed sharing her broad experience.

Practical equine rehabilitation: a review of available modalities | Friday 25 June 1:30pm

Rehabilitation programmes for recovery to performance level after soft tissue limb injuries | Friday 25 June 4:00pm

Marcia Fletcher

Introduction to equine anesthesia | Friday 25 June 8:00am | What happens to our equine patients when we induce anaesthesia? How do their physiological parameters differ from that of small animals? This lecture will focus on the fundamentals of equine anaesthesia including the challenges we face to get them through their sedation, anaesthesia and recovery period with as little complications as possible.  

High risk equine anaesthesia | Friday 25 June 11:30am | The risk of anaesthetic related death to equine patients markedly increases when they are considered sick and compromised. Abdominal emergencies such as colic and uroperitoneum are two of the most critical equine patients we anaesthetise. This lecture describes the likely anaesthetic complications as well as monitoring and support in these intense cases.

Paul Fraser

Paul was in equine clinical practice for over 40 years at Cambridge Veterinary Services (later known as Cambridge Equine Hospital) before retiring in 2017. During that time, he worked in all areas of equine practice but had a special interest in reproduction and it is from his experience gained in this field that he will talk to us today.

VPIS: Paul worked for over 40 years in fulltime equine practice in Cambridge before retiring in 2017. In 2014 he was appointed as a Board member and assessor for VPIS and this has been a role that he continues to be actively involved in. Through this insurance work and other roles with the NZ Equine Research Foundation, Paul has found himself to be in the privileged position of being able to work with, and hopefully be of assistance to, many of our equine veterinarians.

VPIS Update | Wednesday 23 June 1:30 pm

How to diagnose a pregnancy in a miniature mare | Thursday 24 June 1:45pm | Because of the size of the miniature horse, veterinarians often are unsure as to the best method of performing a physical pregnancy test on a mini mare. This presentation describes a proven technique for performing a manual ultrasound examination per rectum.

How to perform a Caslick procedure | Thursday 24 June 2:20pm | The caslick operation is a vital tool in managing reproductive performance in mares. Because of their pelvic shape, it is especially important in thoroughbreds. The goal of an effective caslick is to create a functional valve at the level of the vulva thereby limiting the retrograde flow of air into the reproductive tract. This presentation describes a proven technique for performing this procedure.